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Why Hearing Aids Are Not Covered By Medicare

We found an in-depth article to share with you if you are wondering why hearing aids are not covered by Medicare. As explained in The Hearing Journal February 2017 article, "hearing aids do not fall under the definition of a durable medical device, which Medicare.gov describes as the following: Durable (long lasting) Not usually useful to someone who isn't sick or injured Used in your home Has an expected lifetime of at least three years" Click Here to go the article for more information.

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Bluetooth Hearing Aids

Bluetooth Hearing Aids / Made For iPhone Hearing Aids Bluetooth hearing aids have caught the attention of the public in the last few years. Generally, when people are talking about Bluetooth hearing aids, they are talking about Made For iPhone hearing aid technology (MFI). Made For iPhone hearing aids were first introduced by GN Resound with their LINX platform in 2014. They were quickly followed by Starkey’s Halo Made For iPhone hearing aids. However, while many hearing aids are advertised as Android compatible they are not the same as Made For iPhone. Phonak and Unitron have delivered a traditional Bluetooth...

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Rechargeable Hearing Aids A new generation of hearing aid technology has introduced us to rechargeable hearing aids.  Rechargeable hearing aids have been available for a long time, but the battery life was limited to a few hours, which is inconvenient compared to having to charge them once a day like we do our cell phones.  With this new technology, manufacturers have been able to meet the one-charge-per-day standard that consumers have wanted for years, and are accustomed to with their mobile phones. Rechargeable hearing aid features: A full day of use. The new products provide 15- 20 hours of use...

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How Loud Is Too Loud?

Every day we hear a variety of sounds. Sounds that are too loud, or loud sounds over a long time, can damage your hearing. The loudness of sounds is measured in decibels (dB). Learn the decibel levels for different sounds and know which noises can cause damage to your hearing. Protect your ears when you are involved in a loud activity. How loud is too loud? Decibel level               What we hear 10 dB                           Normal breathing 20 dB                           Rustling leaves, mosquito 30 dB                           Whisper 40 dB                           Stream, refrigerator humming 50-60 dB                     Quiet office 50-65 dB                     Normal conversation 60-65 dB                    ...

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In-Ear Monitors and Custom Molds and Plugs

Musician In-Ear Monitors and Custom Molds Hearing is important to the livelihood of a musician.  However, musical performance may create sounds loud enough to cause permanent hearing loss and can interfere with the musician’s ability to perform the daily tasks of his or her profession or hobby. Many musicians use in-ear ear monitors to regulate the levels of sound they absorb on the stage while performing.  In-ear monitors are devices used by musicians to listen to music or to hear a custom mix of vocals and stage instrumentation for live performance or recording studio mix.  They are often custom fitted...

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Hearing Loss

Hearing Loss On average, most people don’t know how to recognize the first signs of hearing loss because it most often occurs gradually and is an invisible issue that can be disregarded initially without realizing there is a problem. Many times it is friends and family that notice the loss first because the person with the hearing loss mistakenly thinks other people are mumbling or not speaking clearly and doesn’t realize the difficulty is with their ability to hear. If you suspect you or a loved one may have a hearing problem, it is recommended you have your hearing evaluated...

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Additional Websites

Helpful Sources for Additional Information Regarding Hearing Aids Acoustic Neuroma Association, USA www.anausa.org  The Acoustic Neuroma Association's (ANA) website contains information about acoustic neuromas. American Tinnitus Association www.ata.org The American Tinnitus Association's (ATA) website contains information about treatment options for tinnitus. The Center for Disease Control's (CDC) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) website www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise  contains useful information about noise and hearing loss prevention CDC . NIH, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/noise.asp contains information on noise and hearing loss from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Vestibular Disorders Association, USA www.vestibular.org -The...

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